Tuesday, May 23, 2017

[Review] Romancing the Throne by Nadine Jolie Courtney

Romancing the Throne by Nadine Jolie Courtney
Version: ARC paperback
Rating: 3.5 stars

Release Date: May 30th 2017



I didn't expect myself to enjoy this as much as I did, but it was certainly an adorable read.

From my knowledge, this book is supposed to be based off of Kate and Pippa Middleton, with Prince William in tow. If they were all in high school and had high school-esque problems, as everyone in high school tends to do.

The first 100 pages reminded me of The Thousandth Floor - everyone is rich, everyone's got something to lose, and everyone was just so damn spoiled that I almost got tired of reading it and wanted to put it down.

Tuesday, May 16, 2017

My #AsianLitBingo TBR!

Hey everyone! Long time no see. This is a little bit of a late post, but I've been really excited for this reading challenge. Here are the books I'll be reading/have read for this reading challenge.

1. Historical Fiction with Asian MC - Under a Painted Sky by Stacey Lee

Friday, April 28, 2017

[Review] A Study in Charlotte by Brittany Cavallaro

A Study in Charlotte by Brittany Cavallaro
Series: Charlotte Holmes #1
Version: Hardcover
Rating: 3.5 stars

Published: March 1st 2016

Goodreads Synopsis:
The last thing Jamie Watson wants is a rugby scholarship to Sherringford, a Connecticut prep school just an hour away from his estranged father. But that’s not the only complication: Sherringford is also home to Charlotte Holmes, the famous detective’s great-great-great-granddaughter, who has inherited not only Sherlock’s genius but also his volatile temperament. From everything Jamie has heard about Charlotte, it seems safer to admire her from afar.
From the moment they meet, there’s a tense energy between them, and they seem more destined to be rivals than anything else. But when a Sherringford student dies under suspicious circumstances, ripped straight from the most terrifying of the Sherlock Holmes stories, Jamie can no longer afford to keep his distance. Jamie and Charlotte are being framed for murder, and only Charlotte can clear their names. But danger is mounting and nowhere is safe—and the only people they can trust are each other.

A Study in Charlotte imagines a world where the greatest detective duo of all time, Sherlock Holmes and Dr. John Watson, had descendants, and those descendants landed up at the same private boarding school in Connecticut Sherringford.

Meet Jamie Watson and Charlotte Holmes, following in their predecessors' footsteps and are solving cases of murder and clearing their names.

So I wasn't sure how I felt about this book right until the midway point. I was still trying to wrap my head around the strangeness of it all. I wasn't sure if the tone of the book was supposed to be serious or funny, and it confused me at points. This is probably because I am not well versed in Holmes's mysteries, and knowing Holmes and Watson as characters in their original works would have gotten me accustomed to Jamie and Charlotte's strange quirks (Charlotte doing oxy, for instance). And how they hit it off and got close to each other so quickly! (The Watson to her Holmes) So, all in all, this part was definitely slower than the rest of the novel.

Wednesday, April 26, 2017

[Review] The Scorpion Rules by Erin Bow

The Scorpion Rules by Erin Bow
Series: Prisoners of Peace #1
 Version: ARC Paperback
Rating: 2 stars

Published: September 22nd 2015

Goodreads Synopsis:
The world is at peace, said the Utterances. And really, if the odd princess has a hard day, is that too much to ask?
Greta is a duchess and crown princess—and a hostage to peace. This is how the game is played: if you want to rule, you must give one of your children as a hostage. Go to war and your hostage dies.
Greta will be free if she can survive until her eighteenth birthday. Until then she lives in the Precepture school with the daughters and sons of the world’s leaders. Like them, she is taught to obey the machines that control their lives. Like them, she is prepared to die with dignity, if she must. But everything changes when a new hostage arrives. Elián is a boy who refuses to play by the rules, a boy who defies everything Greta has ever been taught. And he opens Greta’s eyes to the brutality of the system they live under—and to her own power.
As Greta and Elián watch their nations tip closer to war, Greta becomes a target in a new kind of game. A game that will end up killing them both—unless she can find a way to break all the rules. 
Goats - the shapers of history.
That, my friends, is what most of the book is made up of. Goats. Not that I don't like goats, but it says a lot if there was more goat mentioning that say, actual character development. 

Conceptually, this story sounds really cool. For the first chapter, I was reeled in. Children of rulers taken as hostages and killed if their country enters a war? AI's running the world? Count me in. It's something different from the other dystopia novels I've read. 

But it wasn't executed the way I hoped. There's Greta, our main character and one of the seven hostages being held in the Prefecture. There's Xie, another hostage and one of Greta's love interests. When their friend Sidney gets killed by the Swan Riders, who do the killing of hostages when countries declare war, Elian comes in his place, as the hostage of the newly formed kingdom of Cumberland. Elian is rebellious when Greta is obedient - but the two of them learn much from each other.

Tuesday, April 25, 2017

[Review] Four Weeks, Five People by Jennifer Yu

Four Weeks, Five People by Jennifer Yu
Version: ARC Paperback
Rating: 3 stars

Release Date: May 2nd 2017

Goodreads Synopsis:
They're more than their problems
Obsessive-compulsive teen Clarissa wants to get better, if only so her mother will stop asking her if she's okay.
Andrew wants to overcome his eating disorder so he can get back to his band and their dreams of becoming famous.
Film aficionado Ben would rather live in the movies than in reality.
Gorgeous and overly confident Mason thinks everyone is an idiot.
And Stella just doesn't want to be back for her second summer of wilderness therapy.
As the five teens get to know one another and work to overcome the various disorders that have affected their lives, they find themselves forming bonds they never thought they would, discovering new truths about themselves and actually looking forward to the future.
I received this ARC from Miss Print's (Emma) ARC Adoption over here! Thank you Emma!

This will be a hard review to tackle, so please bear with me.

Four Weeks, Five People is told in alternating 5-POVs from the characters attending a wilderness therapy camp for the summer for their respective disorders. Stella has an anger-based depression and it's her second time coming to the camp. Clarisa has OCD and has a mother who is never satisfied with anything she does. Ben has a dissociative disorder and makes everything in his life into a movie. Mason has narcissist personality disorder and he thinks everyone at the camp is below him. Andrew has an eating disorder and he yearns to return back to his band and make them famous. 

The five of them are stuck together for four weeks and learn much about themselves and the people surrounding them.